1. First-time travelers are generally willing to purchase a package tour, in large part because information asymmetry makes it impossible for them to assess in advance which tour elements in an unknown destination will be satisfactory. However, that effect wears off quickly as the travelers become more knowledgeable about the destination.

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  2. Leaders consider strategy to be driven by personal perceptions and analysis and expressly reject the “textbook” strategy tools. Executives also consider that strategy tools absorb time and energy needed for more immediate operational tasks, and are too simple to capture the complex dynamics of the hospitality industry.

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  3. This study displays a discrete choice analysis of the responses of 808 hotel guests in Hong Kong and deduces the guests’ willingess to pay for various room attributes.

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  4. Revenue management studies for the hospitality industry is an evolving field as it relates to several areas. It demands that education and training for revenue management practitioners evolves as well.

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  5. The key to an effective hospitality education is to combine three aspects of knowledge: savoir, savoir-faire, and savoir-etre.

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  6. This study assesses Groupon offers in three major US cities and deduces the key factor in making the deal a success.

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  7. Although the world of haute cuisine involves substantial financial and personal investment, the success of these establishments rests heavily on critical reviews found in two publications, Michelin and Gault-Millau.

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  8. An idea that is merely novel is not necessarily creative. For the master chefs, however, creativity is systematic, going even further than problem solving, and extends to surprise.

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  9. A perspective on intuition as a force both in creativity and in interpreting the creative process used by chefs.

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  10. Expert interviews with eighteen European haute cuisine chefs confirmed the essential value of the master-apprentice relationship, and revealed three overall themes relating to the chefs’ creativity: social appropriateness, open-ended contexts, and creative voice.

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  11. A study of 115 European hoteliers demonstrates the complexities of GMs’ autonomy status, since autonomy levels vary by the functional area.

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  12. According to a study, managers of hotel spas that are outsourced to an independent spa operator often struggle to fulfill their responsibilities to both firms.

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  13. The general manager of the “Argentina Suites” hotel had learned that running a family business is far more challenging than he had ever imagined.

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  14. Applying the competitive strategy principles outlined by Michael Porter, this study assessed the effects of strategic orientation (i.e., cost leadership, differentiation, and focus) on the performance of 332 large and small Swiss hotels.

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  15. A case study of “Argentina Suites”, a hotel in Buenos Aires, highlights the many issues facing owners living in one country and operating a hotel in another country.

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  16. A study of reviews of 319 London hotels found that the volume of reviews had a greater effect on revenue per available room (RevPAR) for lower-tier properties.

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  17. An analysis of well over 10,000 U.S. hotel transactions over a 29-year period confirms the notion that the more idiosyncratic the property, the more difficult it is to repurpose and thus to sell, and the more likely that the owner will concede a discount.

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  18. Interviews with representatives of the four international hotel chains highlighted the importance of applying brand standards to ensure asset specificity and thereby increase control benefits while reducing control expenses, including bargaining and monitoring costs.

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  19. An analysis of perceptions of 765 Chinese tourists regarding service quality, company reputation, and price sensitivity in relation to outbound tour operators and inbound tour operators.

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  20. Although researchers often use national affiliations as the indication of a traveler’s culture, an analysis of the motivations for travel by Chinese tourists found subtle differences among four subcultures.

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  21. « Zero-fare » group tours in China are characterized by relatively low initial cost but uncertain quality and follow-through.

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  22. Three typologies to explain the tourist motivation and travel behavior patterns.

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  23. This study highlights the factors causing China to outlaw the so-called « zero-fare » package tours.

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  24. Study found that Hong Kong’s service providers do an overall good job in satisfying their corresponding visitors and provides clues for how to improve satisfaction.

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  25. Using a variety of different methods, including analysis of cross-sectional and panel data, the studies of both single countries and groups of nations generally support the concept of tourism-led growth.

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  26. Tourism production has to an extent been fragmented across countries, but the resulting specialization has developed in two different ways for developed nations and developing countries.

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  27. This is an editorial introduction to the papers published in a special issue of Tourism Economics based on refereed papers from the third International Association for Tourism Economics (IATE), held at Bournemouth University, UK, in 2011.

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  28. This empirical analysis confirms a two-way flow by which nations simultaneously import and export tourism services.

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  29. A model of tourism that compares the effects on urban and rural regions estimates the potential, unexpectedly negative effect of a boom in urban tourism on the rural economy under certain conditions.

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  30. A survey of 139 residents and 13 community leaders paints a mixed picture at best of the economic and social effects of tourism on a village in northern Tanzania.

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  31. An examination of two segments of the tourism industry outlines the shifting balance of trade for tourism production among fourteen members of the European Union.

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  32. This study analyses the relationships between tourism exports, imports of capital goods and economic growth and the causalities between these variables in the case of the Spanish economy over the period 1960-2003.

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  33. Drivers of innovation in hospitality.

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  34. The historic arc of French gastronomy and the development of haute cuisine is one of gradual injection of increasing freedom and creativity for chefs.

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  35. A case study analysis of service procedures focused on the entire service provision in a fine-dining restaurant in which customers considered the wine presentation, to be particularly important.

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  36. This conceptual examination of the nature of culinary innovation highlights the balancing act that creative chefs must perform between the sophistication of their creative concepts and the popularity of a new idea.

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  37. Interviews with eighteen chefs at Michelin-starred restaurants found that the jury is still out on the nature and staying power of molecular gastronomy, which includes a strong focus on the chemistry and physics of cooking.

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  38. For true innovation, restaurants must avoid reversion to the mean and instead promote the idiosyncrasies of creativity.

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  39. This conceptual paper explores the problems associated with trying to address culture as one of the key aspects in effective workplace strategies.

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  40. An analysis of creativity and innovation in haute cuisine based on a phenomenological approach involving open-ended interviews with 18 of the world’s best chefs, as rated by Michelin and Gault Millau.

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  41. In the study of patrons waiting at a restaurant, three-quarters said they would accept a time-limited coupon, the chance to order from a discounted prix-fixe menu, or an outright cash discount of 5 to 10 percent.

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  42. According to a study, frustration with a service failure and inadequate information regarding that failure are two drivers of the likelihood that a consumer will complain.

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  43. When 358 consumers were asked to describe a recent restaurant complaint, two-thirds of them recalled complaining about service, and the remainder about food issues.

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  44. This survey of 550 restaurant respondents found that past success in adopting servers’ recommendations is a strong predictor of whether restaurant guests will again follow recommendations.

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  45. Study found that co-worker support was a major factor in creating a guest orientation and promoting excellent service.

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  46. The restaurant business has developed substantially over the past five decades, as the industry and researchers have studied how to improve revenues and by focusing on customer satisfaction.

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  47. Service failures in restaurants typically fall into one of three categories, namely, food, service, and atmosphere, and the remedy for any one of these must be appropriate to the guest’s expectations.

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  48. An analysis of a restaurant’s income statement and its balance sheet can provide a window into the operation’s strengths and weaknesses, as well as its opportunities.

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  49. A test of various lighting styles and four different brightness levels of guest room televisions found fairly strong support for the energy conservation steps taken in Cornell’s four-diamond Statler Hotel.

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